US Military Aviation
Flight Helmets
US NAVY 70s-80s



During the 70s several US NAVY pilots start to be equipped with custom fit APH-6 helmets with updated liners and oxygen mask these "transitional" helmets were modified at squadron level. New helmets with unique " swing box" bayonet receivers, probably based on DH-151 shell (later standardised as PRK-37/P) or modified APH-6, were also produced by Sierra. These types of helmets were utilized with the standard USN MS22001 oxygen mask but a modified version of USAF MBU-5/P was sometimes also used.
In the early 80s the most important innovation was the introduction of the PRK-37/P shell which was the base for most of the USN HGU's type helmets used during the 80s. The different nomenclature (HGU-33/P, HGU-34/P, HGU-43,HGU-45/P, HGU-47/P etc..) was relevant to the helmets different compositions in avionics, linen, visors etc. At the beginning of the 80s a new model of oxygen mask was also introduced: the MBU-12/P, which in the USN modified version has a different nomencalture such as MBU-14/P, MBU-15/P, MBU-17/P etc. These oxygen masks have been utilized with the USN flight helmets from the 80s through today.

Custom fit APH-6 and APH-6E or based on DH-151 shell

In the early 1970s a number of US NAVY pilots start to be equipped with custom fitted helmets based on APH-6s shell or DH-151 shell sometimes modified on squadron level basis. At the beginning the form fit were procured by the users directly from commercial sources like the Protection Inc. and Sierra. These helmets were normally updated with more confortable foam liner and new edgeroll. Some of the US NAVY APH-6 single visor have been custom fitted using the USAF HGU-2A/P custom fit form. These APH-6 custom fitted with USAF form fit take the designation of APH-6E. In these helmets the hole previously required by the old butterfly clips is filled and new cast aluminum oxygen mask receivers of the same type as seen on USAF HGU-2A/P are installed.
These helmets, whose can be considered a "transitional" customized models between the APH-6 series of the 60s and the new HGUs series of the 80s, were utilized with the standard USN MS22001 oxygen mask as well as in some cases also with modified version of USAF MBU-5/P.


F-4 pilots, Bill Freckleton, Garry Weigand and MCNary from VF-111 in the 1972 wearing the early APH-6 custom fitted or a custom fitted helmet based on DH-151 shell. The USN APH-6s customized with USAF HGU-2A/P custom fit form take the designation of APH-6E. (US NAVY)
Custom fitted APH-6 or APH-6E flight helmet from USN squadron VF-213. In this period, instead to be reflectve tapped, mostly of the US NAVY helmet were painted in the squadron colors and than metal reflective flakes were applied. (Milehigh)

Sierra custom fitted APH-6 flight hemet with the VMA-314 squadron colors. Note the double visor "ramshorn" housing typically of APH-6B and APH-6C. (Milehigh)
VF-84 "Jolly Rogers" pilot in 1979 wearing a custom fitted APH-6 modified at squadron level basis. Note the brown rubber edge roll and the USN variant of USAF MBU-5/P oxygen mask. The images was taken on board of USS Nimitz during the filming of "THE FINAL COUNTDOWN". (Bryna Company Production)


Another VF-84 squadron level basis customized APH-6 with USN MS22001 oxygen mask. The helmet is painted in yellow with further application of reflective metal flakes, black reflective tape chevrons and squadron skull decals complete the helmet design. This complete late 70s "Jolly Rogers" equipment is displayed in the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington.
Another unusual USN helmet which seems to be based on APH-6 shell. This helmet has been modified with new form fit and PRU-36/P double visor assembly normally used on HGU-44/P. Note that in this case the original APH-6 "butterfly" oxygen mask retainers have been mantained.

Grumman test pilot Charles A. "Chuck" Sewell with custom fitted APH-6 or more likely custom fitted helmet based on DH-151 shell fitted with Hardman receivers facing aft used in the early experimental ejection head reel on the GRU seat. (Grumman)
APH-6 custom fitted flight helmet in the color of the Blue Angels USN Acrobatic Team. The helmet has the new form fit but the butterfly receivers have been mantained.

US NAVY custom fitted APH-6 or APH-6E used during the 70s.This helmet was upgraded with form fit and cast aluminum oxygen mask receivers but the lateral plastic washers used on the APH-6A for earcup retention have been mantained.When the USN APH-6 helmets were updated with the USAF form fit they take the designation of APH-6E.
APH-6 custom fitted flight helmet in the color of the Blue Angels USN Acrobatic Team as used during the 70s. The helmet has the new form fit but in this case the Hardman "Christmas tree bayonet" receivers have been installed.

US NAVY custom fitted APH-6 or APH-6E in the color of VF-96 "Fighting Falcons". this helmet, displayed at the Pensacola Naval Aviaton Museum, belonged to the US Navy MIG Killer Randy Cunningham.
APH-6 custom of the early 70s with double visor "ramshorn" housing and straight bayonet receivers used on late variant of APH-5


APH-6 custom with double visor "ramshorn" housing and external boom mounted microphone. The helmet is taped in the colour of the WAV-113 "Black Eagles"and its avionic has been retofitted for its utilizaton in E-2 Hawkeye "Airborne Early Warning" aircraft.
A very beautiful example of APH-6 custom of Marines Squadron VMF (AW) 235 with double visor "ramshorn" housing and Oxygen mask MS 22001 with pressure regulator. (Bluelight)

APH-6 custom of VA 27 "Royal Maces" with Oxygen Mask MS 22001 (Chameloon)
US Navy APH-6 custom of the middle of 70s made by Protection inc. and Oxygen mask MS 22001 . (Csardude)
US Navy APH-6 custom of the late of 70s. Note the brown rubber edge roll and the flaking refective particles applied over the blue paint of the visor cover and the oxygen mask bayonet receivers.
US Navy APH-6 custom of the middle of 70s with straight bayonet receivers used on late variant of APH-5 and external boom mounted microphone.
US Marines APH-6 custom with double visor "ramshorn" housing and Oxygen mask MS 22001 in the color of VMAT (AW) 202 of the late of 70s early 80s.
Custom fit APH-6 or APH-6E in the colour of VF-84 "Jolly Rogers" during the early 80s. The helmet was used with US Navy variant of MBU-12/P with external microphone amplifier, oxygen pressure regulator and REDAR hose.
US Navy APH-6 custom or APH-6E with Oxygen mask MS 22001 in the color of VF-111 "Sundowners" during the middle of the 70s.
Very interesting US Navy APH-6 custom of the early 80s belong to VA 113 "Stingers" flying on A-7E Corsair II. Note the US Navy variant of MBU-5/P
US Navy APH-6 custom with double visor "ramshorn" housing typically of APH-6B and APH-6C in the color of VA-52 "Knightriders" flying the A6E Intruder during the late of the 70s.
US Navy custom flight helmet based on DH-151 shell with HGU-43/P dual visors. The flight helmets in this configuration were generally used during the late 70s or early 80s on A-6 Intruder and RA-5 Vigilante.
Beautiful US Navy APH-6E custom in the color of VF-84 of the late 70s (Auction internet site)
US Navy custom flight helmet based on DH-151 shell from VF-102 Diamondbacks. This helmet was used by CDR Dan "Lurch" Bunting on F-4J Phantom II in 1980-1981 (Marc Koch)
US Navy APH-6E custom in the color of VF-21 of the late 70s when the squadron was flying the F-4 Phantom
"swing-a-line" bayonet receivers helmet (APH-6 or DH-151 shell?)

During the 70s another "transitional" helmets have been developed by Sierra and Protection Inc. These helmets, identifiable for the unique typology of "Swing-a-line" bayonet receivers, were probabbly based on modified APH-6 or DH-151 (later standardized as PRK-37/P) shell.
Sierra flight helmet with "swing-a-line" bayonet receivers. Note the internal linen, the earcups and the APH-6 style communication cable.(Figmo)

VF-111 "Sundowners" F-14A Tomcat Pilot with "swing-a-line" bayonet receivers helmet and oxygen mask MS22001. (US NAVY)
VF-114 "Aardwark" F-14A Tomcat Pilot with "swing-a-line" bayonet receivers helmet.Note the communication cable fixed with a small clamp in the helmet's chin strap fixation screw. (US NAVY)

Sierra "swing-a-line" bayonet receivers helmet and unusual Sierra low-profile oxygen mask Navy 756 serie. (Highlander)
VMA-513 pilot on USMC AV-8A Harrier wearing a "swing-a-line" bayonet receivers helmet and low-profile oxygen mask Navy 756 serie.
(Naval Aviation News)


Sierra custom fit APH-6B with "swing-a-line" bayonet receivers. The helmet shell has been modified with venting holes in the receivers area and the visors hose has been trimmed in order to get better upper visibility range.
Protection Inc. helmet in the color of VF-213 with "swing-a-line" bayonet receivers.

Sierra custom fit APH-6 with "swing-a-line" bayonet receivers and MS22001 oxygen mask (csardude) .
Protection Inc. helmet with "swing-a-line" bayonet receivers and low-profile oxygen mask Navy 756 serie. (Leteur3v)


Custom fit APH-6 with "swing-a-line" bayonet receivers in the colour of VF-24 during the late 70s. (Bellsaviation.com)
HGU-2A/P in Naval service

The HGU-2A/P was introduced around 1961 as an improved version of the HGU-2/P. This helmet contains improved fitting pads that make the helmet more stable and an adjustable nape starp. The HGU-2A/P shell has three ventilation holes in the crown under the visor housing whose were manufactured from the factory only in the early configuration. Dual visors configuration of HGU-2A/P were also introduced both with one and three-pieces ramshorn housing assembly. In the middle 1970 a number of USAF pilots start to be equipped with custom fit HGU-2A/P based helmets procured from the supplier company like the Protection Inc. and Sierra, and applied on squadron level basis. These helmet based on modified HGU-22/P shell were normally updated with more confortable foam liner, new edgeroll and new visor cover. The holes previously required by the old headset fixation screw and adjustment drawstrings were not anymore used. These helmets, whose can be considered a "transitional" customized models (similar to the ones used by the US NAVY which were based on APH-6 series).
Even if the HGU-2A/P helmets were generally used by USAF pilots, evidences show that in some very rare cases the US Navy or US Marines pilots also worn customized HGU-2A/P helmets.
Custom fit HGU-2A/P used by US Marines pilot from Harrier training squadron VMAT-203 during the 80s

Other image of the Custom fit HGU-2A/P in the color of the US Marines Harrier training squadron VMAT-203.
HGU-2A/P probably used by US Navy crew or USAF pilot on exchange program with US Navy.

HGU-33/P ; HGU-34/P

The U.S.N. HGU-33/P fligh helmet was designed as lightweight replacement to the APH-6 series. The HGU-33/P is based on the PRK-37/P shell assembly constructed of fiberglass cloth molded with epoxy resin. A foam edgeroll around the peripher is covered in black leather.
The standard HGU-33/P uses the VTEC form fit liner and the EEK-4 A/P visor assembly. The helmet incorporate the communication system with H-87B/U earphones and external oxygen mask receivers.The HGU-33/P and 34/P are identical except for the inner liners. The HGU-33/P uses a form fit liner v.s. a styrofoam liner in the HGU-34/P. These helmets were utilized with the NAVY oxygen mask MS22001, MBU-14, 15, 16, 17 but the US NAVY version of MBU-5/P were sometimes also used by U.S.N. pilots during the 70's.

Early HGU-33/P manufactured by Sierra. This helmet was used at Air Test & Evaluation Squadron VX-5 during the 1976-1977. This PRK-37/K shell based helmet was still used with MS 22001 oxygen mask and it has the relevant compatible communicaton cord and plug. (snjmjoe)
HGU-34/P of US NAVY squadron VF-84 "Jolly Rogers" of early 80s. The helmet is worn with MBU-14/P oxygen mask and it is covered with yellow reflective tape. Black chevrons in reflective tape and squadron's skull decals complete the helmet design.

US NAVY Pilot on A-7E Corsair II wearing an HGU-33/P modified with light weight oxygen mask receivers and USN version of USAF MBU-5/P oxygen mask.
(US NAVY)
HGU-33/P and oxygen mask MBU-14/P of the middle 80's with marking of US NAVY F-14 Tomcat squadron VF-143 "Pukin' Dogs"

A-7E pilot of VA-27 "Royal Maces" wearing an HGU-33/P and oxygen mask MBU-14/P on board of USS Carl Vinson in the late 80's. (Motorbooks International)
U.S.M.C. pilot on F/A-18 "Hornet" in late 80s wearing an HGU-33/P with removable camouflage cloth cover and oxygen mask MBU-14/P (USMC)

Even if at first sight this helmet seems to be an HGU-55/P, it is instead a converted HGU-33/P. Because of short supplies of genuine HGU-55/P helmets in the early 90s (priority was given to the U.S.A.F.) some US NAVY PRK-37 shell have been converted to the new HGU-55/P style. The standar EEK-4A/P visor is replaced by a bungee style visor assembly used on HGU-55/P, lightweight bayonnet receivers, the lateral leather pads and the integrated chin/nape stap assembly are also installed. The helmet it is shown with an MBU-14/P oxygen mask. (Chameloon Flightgear on the web)
This HGU-33/P converted in HGU-55/P style is displayed at Naval Aviation Museum in Pensacola. The standard EEK-4A/P visor is replaced by a bungee style visor assembly, but the helmet maintains the standard oxygen mask retainers of HGU-33/P. This helmet with desert camufalge cover was used by VF-21 pilot during Desert Storm in 1991.

Another interesting HGU-33/P converted in HGU-55/P style in the color of the US Navy Fighter Weapons School (TOP GUN) as used during the early 90s
HGU-33/P and oxygen mask MBU-14/P. The helmet is reflective tapped in the design of the VF-111 "Sundowners" as used during the early 80s.


HGU-34/P of the early 80s with MBU-14/P oxygen mask. The visor housing is covered with leather and the helmet shows the marking of the Fleet Replacement Squadron VF- 101 "Grim Reapers"
(Csardude)
HGU-33/P of the late 80s converted in HGU-55/P style helmet and oxygen mask MBU-14/P (Csardude)


Naval Fighter Weapon school (TOP GUN) instructor with HGU-33/P flight helmet and MBU-12/P oxygen mask (US Navy)
HGU-33/P of the middle 80s with a strange variation or experimental prototype of oxygen mask based on MBU-12/P (Csardude)



HGU-33/P with external boom mounted microphone of the late 80s converted in HGU-55/P style helmet (Csardude)
HGU-33/P of the middle 80s in the color of the VF-41 "Black Aces"


HGU-34/P of the early 80s and oxygen mask MBU-14/P of the VF-33.
HGU-33/P of the late 80s and oxygen mask MBU-14/P of the VF-84.


HGU-33/P of the late 80s and US Navy variant of oxygen mask MBU-12/P with external amplifier. This beaufiful specimen show the design of the VF-111 Squadron on F-14A Tomcat.
HGU-35/P

The HGU-35/P helmet was developed in the late 70s in order to meet US NAVY requirements for a new lighter fixed wing helmet. This model was developed as an integrated helmet oxygen/communications system. The integral oxygen subsystem featured a new lighweight low-profile mask (Carleton mask), an integral oxygen duct through the helmet, and an external hose with communication wires connecting to the helmet rear. The HGU-35/P Operational Test and Evaluation was carried out in 1979. Apparently the helmet did not meet the expectation and was never put into production.
HGU-35/P in early configuration with standard EEK-4/P visor housing. Note the oxygen hose is positioning downwards from its exit at the rear of the helmet. (Gentex Corporation)

In this pictue the low-profile Carleton oxygen mask is visible. It was specifically developed for the HGU-35/P. (Gentex Corporation)
HGU-35/P in later configuration with a new visor housing with an off-center visor lock knob.
(Paul Taylor)


lateral view of HGU-35/P later configuration. The oxygen hose is positioning to the left rear side.
(Paul Taylor)
Gentex HGU-35/P later configuraton with clear visor and low-profile oxygen mask. (Gentex)

HGU 35/P modified with lightweight visor similar to the one based on HGU-83/P concept also installed on the Tactical Air Helmet.
Gentex HGU-35/P later configuraton with dark visor and low-profile oxygen mask. (Gentex)

HGU 35/P internal oxygen duct location under the fitting pad.
Gentex HGU-35/P and low-profile oxygen mask. (Chameloon)
HGU-37/P (VTAS II)

The R-1825/AVG-8 Visual Target Aquisition Set (VTAS II) is an improved version of the previous VTAS I. It is used in the F-4B,J and N aircraft to determine the pilot's helmet position and thus his line of sight in aircraft coordinates. Once this information is know, the aircraft radar or Sidewinder are selectively slaved to the pilot's line-of-sight for use in air-to-air combat. The HGU-37/P VTAS II helmet is based on the PRK-42/P shell (same as PRK-37/P but drilled for VTAS II).
.
US NAVY HGU-37/P helmet based on Gentex PRK-24/P shell and Honeywell Inc. R-1825/AVG-8 VTAS II system. (Blaster)

The HGU-37/P VTAS II helmet use a PRK-39/P on site fit form liner and the visor VRHMU-1826/1825/AVG-8 IR optic receiver. (Blaster)
US NAVY VTASS II HGU-37/P helmet with modified MBU-5/P oxygen mask.

HGU-42/P

The US NAVY HGU-42/P was an APH-6 with modified avionics and communication system for use by S-3A Viking crew. The modifications were applied to both single visor and double visor versions of the APH-6, and the detailed comms configurations varied. The HGU-42/P was used a stop-gap measure until the HGU-49/P reached the fleet squadrons.
S-3 Viking copilot of VS-41 with HGU-42/P. (US NAVY)


This helmet is believed to be a single visor version of the HGU-42/P with a custom fit poured polyurethane liner. The AM-3597C/A amplifier is mounted externally in a bracket fitted to the right side of the helmet. (Bothanspy and Best of Flightgear)
Dual-visor version of the HGU-42/P from VS-29. Apart from the visor it differs from the single-visor HGU-42/P shown above by having the original styro liner with fitting pads.(Spanky and Best of Flightgear)

In this Dual-visor version of the HGU-42/P from VS-29. the AM-3597C/A amplifier is mounted internally underneath the neck fitting pad.(Spanky and Best of Flightgear)
HGU-42/P from VS-41. The standard modification was removing the standard comm cord and replacing with the CX-13128 comm cord to the helmet and amplifier. The A-13A mask was modified with the U-385/U plug for the microphone and U-75/U for plugging into the high pressure hose, MS-27796 connector for use with the diluter demand regulator. The PRs when building up this helmet spliced two comm cords to modifiy it for use in the S-3 along with the grey rubber edge roll seen on some USAF helmets and SPH-1 and -2 helmets. This helmet was issued and built up for the TACCO in 1974 who was one of the first at VS-41, served a tour at VS-29 then back to VS-29 as an Instructor TACCO in late 1977. (Spanky and Best of Flightgear)

HGU-43/P ; HGU-44/P ; HGU-45/P

These dual visors helmet based on PRK-377P shell have been developed for the utilization on strike aircraft like the A-6 Intruder, EA-6 Prowler and the OV-10 Bronco. The different nomenclatue depends on variation in visors assembly, and communication. The HGU-43/P is equipped with EEK-3/P laser protective dual visor for use in A-6E TRAM. The HGU-44/P is the same as the HGU-43/P only use the PRU-36/P dual visor. The HGU-45/P used on OV-10A is equipped with boom mounted microphone and CX-13164/A communication cable, amplifier and relevant mounting bracket. The specific variant HGU-45A/P only swap the PRU-36/P for an EEK-3/P laser protective dual visor for use in OV-10D aircraft. These helmet were utilized with US NAVY MBU-14/P oxygen mask.
A-6E TRAM Naval Flight Officer wearing an HGU-43/P. This helmet is equipped with EEK-3/P lases protective visors necessary when the laser sensor of the Target Recognition and Attack Multi-sensor (TRAM) is operative. (US NAVY)


HGU-44/P and MBU-14/P oxygen from US NAVY squadron VAQ-134 "Garudas". This helmet was utilized on EA-6B Prowler.
U.S.M.C. OV-10 Bronco crewman wearing an HGU-45/P. Note the boom mounted microphone the relevant amplifier attached on the helmet shell.
(Windrow & Greene Ltd.)


U.S.M.C. NFO on OV-10D Bronco wearing an HGU-45A/P equipped with EEK-3/P laser protective dual visor assembly.
(Arm and Armour Press Ltd.).
US Navy HGU-44/P of VAQ 140 with MBU-14/P Oxygen Mask

HGU-46/P (VTAS II)

The USN HGU-46/P, based on the PRK-42/P shell, incorporate the R-1825/AVG-8(V) Visual Target Acquisition System (VTAS II) and PRK-39A/P liner (VTEC liner). This system has been tested on USN and USMC F-4B, J and N aircraft during the middle-late 70s. It is not clear the differecies between the VTAS II helmet designed HGU-37/P and the one identified as HGU-46/P.
US NAVY HGU-46/P with oxygen MBU-14/P.the VTAS II uses a form fit PRK-37/P shell, the parabolic visor provides the pilot with a collimated image. (Schiffer Publishing Ltd.)


USMC HGU-46/P from VMF (AW)-314 squadron. This particulary hemet is combined with a REDAR equipped MS22001 oxygen mask
US NAVY HGU-46/P. This system has been tested on USN and USMC F-4B, J and N aircraft during the middle-late 70s.

USN HGU-46/P with an unusual continuous visor lacking the nose cut. (Bloodhound)
NADC VTAS III (Based on HGU-35/P))

In response to the Naval Air Systems Command, the Naval Air Development Center, Warminster, Pennsylvania directed the Honeywell Corporation in the integration of the VTAS helmet mounted components into the NADC designed HGU-35/P helmet. The resulting NADC VTAS III helmet is based on fleet experience with VTAS and increased knowledge of helmet sight systems. The VTAS III helmet shell is constructed of Kevlar-49 cloth impregnated with epoxy resin. The crown of the helmet shell contains a layer of 1/8 inch Nomex honeycomb. The design of the shell is based on the NADC designed HGU-35/P helmet developed and fabricated by the TME Corporation of Salem, New Hampshire. The profile of the TME shell is basically that of the APH-6 with modifications below the crown to provide much better visibility, much greater earcup adjusting range and (to some observers) a more pleasing contour without earcup-area bulges. The visibility improvement is achieved by cutting back the APH-6 front-edge contour by about inch all around. The total height of the shell is identical to that of the APH-6; total width is 1/2 inch less. The major modifications to the basic design lie in the addition of bumps for the VTAS sensors and electronics, new tracks and glides for the parabolic visor and a new visor housing also fabricated of Kevlar-49 cloth. The helmet communications were provided by the TME Corporation. They consist of a modified version of the NADC developed NAACH (Non-Acoustic Audio Coupling to the Head) earcup mounted skin contact microphone in conjunction with miniature Roanwell earphone units. The integral oxygen system features a new lightweight low profile mask, an internal oxygen duct through the helmet, and an external hose with communications wires connecting to the helmet at the rear. The mould-in-place liner system was provided by the V-TEC Corporation of Hopewell, Virginia. It makes use of a one piece, leather covered hollow fibreglass shell which actually receives the foam while in a fixture on the pilot's head. It is then placed inside the helmet shell. It is the closest system yet to a custom fitted, foamed-in-place, walk-away-with-the-product liner.
US NAVY VTAS III helmet based on HGU-53/P
HMD/DASH PROTOTYPE HELMET

During the 70s early 80s the Elbit Systems and Protection Inc. developed one of the first type of operational Helmet Mounted Displays (HMD's) based on a Gentex PRK-37 shell. This type of helmet was used operationally in the late 70s early 80s with the AIM-9L missile on the US NAVY F-14's and MARINES Corps F-4's to function as a helmet mounted targeting system between the pilot and the aircraft weapons system.
This helmet was intended to replace the VTAS and it utilises a magnetic tracker instead of the VTAS/IHADSS IR tracking nodules. This very first DASH helmet and the technology and lessons learned from this type of helmet mounted display system paved the way for such current fleet operational helmets like the US Air Force and Navy's JHMCS , TopSight , Agile Eye and the Israeli Air Force DASH.
This very early HMD/DASH helmet was used operationally in the late 70s early 80s on the US NAVY F-14's and MARINES Corps, F-4's. (Surplusagent)

This helmet was indented to repalce the VTAS and represent the early steps to DASH and JHMCS. (Surplusagent)
Wiring system attached to the shell of this early version of HMD/DASH helmet.(Surplusagent)
HGU-47/P

The HGU-47/P series based on PRK-37/P shell with EEK-4A/P single visor, PRK-40 liner assembly and external mounted boom microphone was utilized during the 80s in several typology of US NAVY and U.S.M.C. aircrafts. The helmet's nomenclatures are due to differencies in communications elements (cables, amplifier, microphones etc..) based on specific aircraft utilization.
HGU-47(V)1/P used by pilot, co-piot and crew-member on the S-2, E-2A7B/C, TE-A2, KA-3B, TA-3B, T-28B/C. HGU-47(V)2/P used by pilot, co-pilot and crew-members on the C-1A, C-2A.
HGU-47(V)3/P used on T-34 aircraft.
HGU-47(V)4/P used on P-3 A/B/C.
Gentex HGU-47(V)4/P with M87 boom microphone and CX 4832A/AR cable.
(The flight helmet site)


US NAVY HGU-47(V)4/P with M87 boom microphone and CX 4832A/AR cable. The helmet shows the original scheme of a P-3 Orion squadron.
(Chameloon Flightgear on the web)
US NAVY HGU-47(V)1/P used on T-28 Trojan. The helmet is equipped with external boom microphone CX-131557A comunicatio cable and AM-3597C/A amplifier. (Windrow & Greene Ltd.)


HGU-47(V)3/P utilized on T-34 Mentor. This helmet is equipped with PRK-40 liner assembly, and Headset boom microphone is attached, no amplifier is used and the cable is the CX-1316A/A instead of the CX-13155/A.
HGU-49/P ; HGU-50/P ; HGU-52/P

These typology of helmets are all based on PRK-37/P shell and have been utilized during the 80s in several typology of US NAVY and U.S.M.C. aircrafts. The helmet's nomencaltures are due to differencies in communications elements (cables, amplifier, microphones etc..) liner and visor assembly based on specific aircraft utilization.
HGU-49/P is equipped with EEK-4A/P single visor, PRU-39 Form fit liner, standar headset and boom microphone amplifier for utilization in the S-3 aircraft.
HGU-50/P is equipped with EEK-4A/P single visor, PRU-39 Form fit liner. Standard headset wiring is replaced with the 20039 communication cable to be used in the aft station on EA-3B aircraft.
HGU-52/P is equipped with EEK-4A/P single visor or PRU-36/P dual visor. boom microphone and CX-13155/A communication cable with AM-3597C/A amplifier are also installed for utilizaton on E-2 and A-3 type aircraft.
US NAVY HGU-49/P with boom mounted microphone. The scheme is from USN Antisubmarine squadron VS-22 "Vidars". This helmet was used on S-3A Viking (Tomcatchucky)

US NAVY HGU-52/P flight helmet used in E-2C Hawkeye "Airborne Early Warning" aircraft. (Chameloon Flighgear on the web)
E-2 Crewman wearing an HGU-52/P with PRU-36/P double visor assembly. Note the boom microphone and the relevant communication cable and amplifier.
(US NAVY)


US NAVY HGU-52/P flight helmet with PRU-36/P double visor assembly used by VAW 121 in E-2 Hawkeye "Airborne Early Warning" aircraft.
US NAVY Late 80s HGU-49 from VS-31 with the visor removed and replaced with a lightweight version HGU-55/P style. The oxygen mask used on S-3 Viking took the designation of MBU-15/P (jpayne)



US Navy HGU-49/P flight helmet in the color of VS-29
US Navy HGU-52/P flight helmet in the color of VAW-121 and MBU-17/P Oxygen mask as used on E-2C Hawkeye



US Navy HGU-49/P flight helmet in the color of VS-27 and MBU-15/P Oxygen mask (Spanky)
HGU-53N/P

The Gentex HGU-53N/P helmet was the The Navy version of the USAF HGU-53/P fighter pilot helmet. Designed in the late 80's, this was a prototype flight helmet designed to meet US Navy Fighter Aircrew requirements for a lightweight fighter pilot helmet, but never entered full production. The HGU-53N/P was designed with continuous locking rotary visor system that has been qualified at 600 knots equivalent airspeed (KEAS). The hemet shell is made of a light weight kevlar material, and its profile differs from the previous helmets with a reduction in external dimension for improved canopy clearance. This helmet is equipped with the Navy standard H-87 earphones, a slightly thicker styrene liner and a unique Anti-Snag mount for the lightweight bayonet receiver system. The HGU-53N/P was utilized with the US Navy standard MBU-14/P.
US Navy HGU-53N/P with the experimental continuous locking rotary visor system and the unique Anti-Snag mount for the lightweight bayonet receiver system.

The HGU-53N/P was designed as the US Navy variant of the USAF HGU-53/P
On HGU-53N/P The continuous locking rotary visor system seems to have a different mechanisms between the left and right side.